Comprehensive Blood Test

Spire Private Hospital

This private blood assessment for Comprehensive testing is offered at all thirty two private outpatient departments across England, Scotland and Wales.

Included in each request for Comprehensive testing are a Doctors Referral, all Phlebotomy fees (your blood taken at a Private Hospital), all laboratory fees and includes our GP comments.

Blood Test Explained

Below we have explained each inclusion.

White Blood Cell Count
The WBC (white blood cell) count is a common test within a health assessment and is a measure of your body's ability to fight infection. A normal WBC level can be interpreted as a sign that the first line of defence against invasion by bacteria or other disease causing organisms is intact and functioning. Moderately elevated white cell counts are a sign of acute infection, while very high counts of abnormal white cells are encountered with leukaemia (a relatively rare form of blood cancer).

Red Blood Cell Count
The RBC (red blood cell) count is the number of red blood cells present. It can vary considerably, and a marginally low or high health screening reading may not imply a problem. Significantly reduced numbers within any health check can be associated with anaemia (a deficiency in red cell production, or excessive loss of blood), and very high numbers are seen in polycythaemia (a condition which can be caused by smoking, living at altitude or just because the bone marrow makes too many red cells).
IRON
The serum iron level is a measure of the circulating iron in the blood. It tells us (along with TIBC/UIBC, transferrin and ferritin) the state of the body's iron reserves. An excess in a health screening can indicate disorders of iron storage (such as haemochromatosis), while low levels may indicate (along with changes in TIBC/UIBC, transferrin saturation and ferritin) iron deficiency.
GGT
GGT (gamma GT) is a liver enzyme. High levels are most commonly encountered when alcohol has been drunk at higher than recommended levels in the preceding few weeks. Some medication can lead to higher levels of this enzyme also.
TSH
The TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is a hormone manufactured in the pituitary gland (found in the brain). It s role is to stimulate thyroxine production in the thyroid gland (found in the neck). A high level within a health screening is associated with an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) and a low level is found if the thyroid gland is over-active (hyperthyroidism). Changes in the TSH level alone can indicate underlying thyroid problems even if the thyroxine levels are normal.

Free T4
FT4 (free thyroxine) is the active form of thyroxine, released from the thyroid gland in the neck. Its role is to control metabolism - release of energy from all cells of the body. A lack of thyroxine leads to, for example, tiredness and weight gain, whereas an excess will lead to weight loss, rapid heart rate and anxiety. It is generally believed that this level (FT4) is the most reliable indicator of thyroid status - ie whether the gland is over-active (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism).